Scientist Discover Sounds that Influence Coral to Grow

For years, scientists have been probing the ocean deeps with researches and technologies that would help them allocate ways to save the endangered coral reefs, and now, a solution has come to culmination. As per a recent study, it is proven that when the sound of healthy reefs is played around the dying ones, they can be successfully brought back to life. 

The process involved 

This process is known as “Acoustic Enrichment” meaning, the dying coral reefs will be restored with their former health when the patches of dead coral are attached with speakers that incessantly emit sounds similar to the living ones. The chief objective here is to attract young fishes to the reefs and refurbish them. The experiment was conducted by positioning the speakers on the vast dead stretches of the Great Barrier Reef, and it was discovered that the reefs started growing in volume.

The number of fishes arriving at the reefs doubled their strength and stayed for long. Fishes are the primary catalyzers when it comes to maintaining a seamless harmony between the coral reefs and their contribution to the ecosystems. Therefore, by encouraging their multiplication, the natural recovery process of the coral reefs can be accelerated, and the damage that we have already caused to the sea’s life can be controlled to an extent.

Healthy coral and fishing thriving around it.

The changes that it can instill 

Researchers have further asserted that the true identity of a healthy coral reef is the distinct cacophony of sounds accompanying it. These trickles stem from the constant snapping of shrimps and the whoops and clanks of the fishes, thereby, making way for a solitary sound profile that helps the coral reefs to thrive even amidst extreme conditions. The young fishes are largely drawn towards these sounds whenever they are looking for a safe shelter.

Environmental studies have confirmed that the entire food chain which thrives around the sea bed, such as the detritivores, planktivores, herbivores, and predatory piscivores, are inevitably linked with the coral reefs. Hence, their wellbeing is essential to open doors for a productive marine life. 

As per the statements of the fish biologist, Mark Meekan, based in the Australian Institute of Marine Science, the fishes won’t bring back the life of the coral reefs automatically. However, it would positively speed up their recovery, therefore, implying it with enough space and cleanliness for the corals to regrow.

Scientists are positive about the prospects that acoustic enrichment promise to bring along; if all the guidelines of habitat restoration are followed with utmost sincerity. It will enhance the procedures of marine conservation, particularly the coral reefs, and leave a positive impact on the repercussions of climate change, pollution initiated by plastic and over-fishing. 

The Ocean Clean Up Crew Unveil The “Interceptor”

Born in July 1994, Boyan Slat is a Dutch entrepreneur and inventor who uses technology to help combat global problems. In February 2013, he founded The Ocean Cleanup at a remarkably young age. The organization has since expanded to a team of around 80 people, of which Boyan is currently the CEO. 

In 2018, Boyan led his team to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a massive vortex in the Pacific Ocean utterly loaded with pieces of floating plastic and other garbage. It is, in fact, the largest collection of plastic in all the oceans. 

In their efforts to clear the mess away, The Ocean Cleanup launched its first ever plastic-cleaning device. It was a 2,000-foot U-shaped array known as “System 001,” nicknamed “Wilson.” Unfortunately, Wilson’s sensors and satellite system began to malfunction, and its collected plastic began to leak back into the garbage vortex. Although the device was still successful in clearing out some of the plastic from the vortex, and it thankfully did no environmental damage of its own, ultimately it brought back to port for repairs. 

In summer of 2019, The Ocean Project tried again with a newer and better cleanup device, “System 001/B,” which used an underwater parachute to slow the device’s movement through the water, as well as inflatable bags to speed it up. 

Alas, the new design ran into another problem. It used a cork line to help contain the plastic, in a similar manner to lines that divide the lanes of a swimming pool. As it turned out, the line wasn’t tall enough to prevent plastic from passing over. It will be necessary to improve upon this and make the cork line taller to ensure the device works correctly. 

The Ocean Project still has not given up, and is determined to continue their clean-up efforts at the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. In the meantime, they have focused their efforts on clearing up river pollution. On October 26th, 2019, they unveiled their latest invention, called “The Interceptor.” Having been in development since 2015, it too is built around cleaning up plastic, capable of extracting anywhere from 50,000kg to 100,000kg of trash per day. 

In fact, multiple Interceptors have been built. Two of them are already active in Jakarta (Indonesia) and Klang (Malaysia) respectively. A third Interceptor will be set up in Can Tho in the Mekong Delta (Vietnam) while a fourth will be set up in Santa Domingo (Dominican Republic). There has also been an agreement made to set up another Interceptor near Bangkok, and an in-progress agreement for another one in LA Country (USA). 

While there has been some trial-and-error, everyone at The Ocean Project deserves praise and recognition for their innovative methods and for all the hard work they’ve done to make this planet a brighter, cleaner, and safer place. We all could take some inspiration from them, both in their good cause and in their refusal to let their setbacks stop them. 

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